As a company that really promotes sustainability and supporting the community, we thought it would be great to take a look at how we can be more green, and more resourceful when buying food.
One of the best ways of ensuring a lowered carbon footprint is to buy seasonal produce, grown and cultivated in the UK. Here are some of the reasons why buying local, and buying seasonal can not only reap benefits for the environment, but also for the individual:
 
Environment
British food travels far less from farm to shop than most imported foods, which means you're cutting out a big portion of the transportation journey and reducing energy and impact on the environment.
 
Nutritional Benefits
Local, seasonal foods tend to be fresher, tastier and full of nutrients. Eating the foods that are seasonal will give your body the elements that it needs at that particular time of the year. Unlike some meats from other countries, British meat tends not to have any growth-promoting hormones and is produced to some of the highest welfare standards in the world. You will also have the assurance of knowing what you are eating. Britain has some of the most robust food assurance and traceability systems in the world.
 
Supporting the Economy
Supporting the local economy is incredibly important. You’ll be able to do your part in supporting the farmer, those who work in food processing, the local shopkeeper and the pubs and restaurants selling the food. In recent years, there’s been a real push in supporting our farmers, and now since food transport is so easy, we need to think about the farming communities closer to home.
 
Variety
The variety of food that the UK produces is amazing, each season has something different and delicious to try, with a million different recipes for each one.  From root vegetables to ripe delicious fruit, as a country we’re hardly lacking in diversity! If you’re looking for something new and different to try, we have compiled our favorite recipes in one place! 
 

Spring

Summer

Autumn

Winter

Beef steaks

Sausages

Chicken

Spring lamb

Asparagus

Carrots

Cauliflower

Celeriac

Cucumber

Kale

Purple sprouting broccoli

Savoy cabbage

Sorrel

Spinach

Spring greens

Spring onions

Watercress

Gooseberries

Rhubarb

Crab

Haddock

John dory

Lobster

Mackerel

Monkfish

Prawns

Sea bass

Sea salmon

Trout

Turbot

Beef steaks

Burgers

Chicken

Ham

Lamb

Pork pies

Pork spare ribs

Saltmarsh lamb

Sausages

Venison

Beetroot

Broad beans

Carrots

Cauliflowers

Courgettes

Cucumber

Fennel

Fresh peas

Garlic

Green beans

Lettuce and salad leaves

New potatoes

Radishes

Runner beans

Sage

Salad onions

Squash

Tomatoes

Watercress

Blueberries

Currants

Elderflower berries

Greengages

Loganberries

Plums

Raspberries

Strawberries

Tayberries

Crab

Pilchards

Wild salmon

 

Chicken

Grouse

Ham

Heather-fed lamb

Pies

Pork

Roasts

Sausages

Venison

Field mushrooms

Lettuce

Marrow

Potatoes

Pumpkin

Rocket

Squashes

Sweetcorn

Watercress

Apples

Blackberries

Damsons

Elderberries

Pears

Plums

Sloes

Brill

Dabs

Dover sole

Flounders

Oysters

Skate

Casseroles

Chicken

Gammon

Goose

Partridge

Pheasant

Pies

Roasts

Sausages

Turkey

Venison

Wild duck

Bay leaves

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage

Carrots

Cauliflower

Celeriac

Curly kale

Fennel

Leeks

Parsnips

Potatoes

Red cabbage

Swede

Turnips

Apples

Pears

Quince

Grey mullet

Mussels

scallops

 

 
 

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